Moore County Schools Superintendent Dr. Bob Grimesey says the district will be undergoing some "organizational renovations," aimed at creating "a new culture of collaboration, trust, and respect." 

"The work of the Board of Education and Moore County Schools [MCS] will never return to its status quo, but will foster and cultivate a new normal," he said in a video released on Monday afternoon, June 29.

The carefully-worded statement honored the unprecedented level of public outcry that was sparked by his recent termination — and that succeeded in having him reinstated. But it also expressed a determination that any changes the district makes "follows appropriate due process."

Dr. Bob Grimesey from Moore County Schools on Vimeo.

"After all, are we not the same Moore County community who spoke with a single voice so loud that it gained the attention of the entire state?" Grimesey asked.

The public attention that was focused on MCS as a result of the dismissal of the Superintendent included substantial criticism of the role the Central Office staff plays in determining what is taught and how it is taught in the classroom. 

 

"How then do we channel our newfound energy in a way that is focused and sustainable?" Grimesey asked? "And how do we organize ourselves without dampening our enthusiasm?"

The answer, at least in part, is to trust that the School Board and MCS Administration got the message.

"Rest assured that the Moore County Board of Education, your superintendent, the district leadership team and all of our principals will be good stewards of your mandate and your trust," Grimesey said. 

"We will investigate and analyze the many concerns that have been expressed by our employees, our parents and the general public about our organizational culture, but we will do so in a way that respects the rights of all parties and follows appropriate due process."

Those concerns included considerable criticism from both parents and teachers that the MCS Central Office rules with too heavy a hand, stifling the creativity of classroom teachers.

"We will work with all stakeholders from the classroom level, the building level, the district level and throughout the community to find a proper balance as we move forward," Grimesey said.

But that "balance" does not mean that the Central Office will have no role to play in determining what happens inside the classroom.

"We know that individual teacher autonomy and creativity is vital," Grimesey said, "but we cannot ignore the public’s right to hold all educators — including the superintendent — to an appropriate level of accountability."

The Superintendent concluded his remarks by asking for "patience as we undergo some organizational renovations," and suggesting that future progress reports will be posted to the MCS website.

 

Here's a transcript of the Superintendent's remarks:

Message from Superintendent Dr. Bob: “A new normal will be fostered and cultivated.”

Three weeks have passed since I answered your call to return as Superintendent of Moore County Schools. With the School Board’s approval of my reinstatement on June 8, my calling realigned with my career. My gratitude to everyone remains deep and genuine, but it also remains tempered by my sense of obligation, by our shared responsibility for our children and by my awareness of the enormous challenges that we face.

We may never again doubt our capacity to achieve anything on behalf of our children. After all, are we not the same Moore County community who spoke with a single voice so loud that it gained the attention of the entire state? Your unified voice may have been triggered by a single decision, but the substance of your message involved much more. You stood up for those ideals and principles that you share across all geographic, economic, ethnic, political and cultural boundaries within our community. You stood and cheered for the possibility of greater economic vitality and quality of life for all of our families, all of our citizens and, most importantly, all of our children.

How then do we channel our newfound energy in a way that is focused and sustainable? And how do we organize ourselves without dampening our enthusiasm? Rest assured that the Moore County Board of Education, your superintendent, the district leadership team and all of our principals will be good stewards of your mandate and your trust. We will work with all stakeholders from the classroom level, the building level, the district level and throughout the community to find a proper balance as we move forward.

We will investigate and analyze the many concerns that have been expressed by our employees, our parents and the general public about our organizational culture, but we will do so in a way that respects the rights of all parties and follows appropriate due process. From this process of internal reflection and examination, a new culture of collaboration, trust and respect will rise.

Successful collaborative efforts in any organization, especially in a school district, must find the right balance between individual liberty and community order. We know that individual teacher autonomy and creativity is vital, but we cannot ignore the public’s right to hold all educators—including the superintendent—to an appropriate level of accountability. Through their involvement as employees, volunteers, advisory council members, or informed community members, MCS staff, parents and other citizens will continue to be a vital part of the decisions that impact our schools. We will continue to solicit and appreciate constructive criticism that is shared in a spirit of mutual concern and respect.

Our School Board will soon be whole, and its meetings must be managed efficiently with appropriate order and with respect for the rights of all. The work of the Board of Education and Moore County Schools will never return to its status quo, but it will foster and cultivate a new normal that will continue to support the innovative programs and efforts of our district to teach and graduate college and career-ready students and prepare them to be successful citizens in the 21st Century.

Accept my thanks again for your support of Moore County Schools and for your patience as we undergo some organizational renovations. As the need may arise, we may use our website as a venue for updating you on our progress. So, stay tuned. Otherwise, accept my best wishes for a safe, restful and enjoyable summer vacation season.

I am Dr. Bob Grimesey, and it remains my privilege to serve Moore County’s children, its employees, its families and its citizens.

 

 


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